The Rosette

To jump start my brain into resolution-thinking mode instead of the panic-no-job mode, I went to the library and read some books on consumer behavior, beads, fundraising, and my favorite blog topic of the moment, scarves. I am scarf energized.

While I learned how to tie the basic half and whole knots, I happened upon the rosette design, a pretty coiled flower design.  Other than matching clothing colors whether the colors are in style or not, I am not a trendy dresser.

In other words, I thought the rosette design had just re-emerged into fashion conciousness when I saw the design bedecking a pair of divine leather thongs and a skinny belt in an array of colors in the April 2010 issue of a Talbots catalog. I had even forgotten I had seen the  design in one of my sister’s Victoria Trading catalogs. I never paid much attention to the design except to note that in the catalog it was red and a flower. However, according to Wikipedia, the rosette design has been in human design consciousness since ancient Mesopotamian artisans patterned the circular leaf design from nature’s flowers and used the design to adorn funeral steles and stone sculptures. 

I have provided an introduction for tying a scarf into a half knot and a basic rosette that can be found in the book titled “Scarf Magic” by Donna Shryer.

Supplies

Oblong or rectangle scarf

In order to learn how to tie a scarf into a rosette, you will need to know how to tie a basic half knot.

How to Tie a Half Knot

1.  Fold an oblong scarf around the back of  neck so that the two sides evenly hang in the front.

2.  Cross the  ends to form an X.

3.  Pull the upper side behind the lower side and then pull the upper side up through the neckband.

4.  Flip the upper side over the lower side.

How to Tie a Basic Rosette

1.  Tie a basic half knot.

2.  Bring the end of the scarf together and twist into a coil.

3.  Tightly twist until a circle is formed.

4.  Tuck the ends behind and then through the center of the coil.

Now you’re done!

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